MuseumNext Digital Summit: Day Four

I have just finished listening to the final presentation of day four that covered how to take cemetery tours online – more about that later. Firstly, the theme of today was programs with impact. I really want to stress that this isn’t just a theme isolated to the presentations today, but one that both stood out to me and helped me to connect everything together.

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MuseumNext Digital Summit: Day Three

For each day of the Digital Summit I’m trying to find an overarching theme that helps me to organise the content I’m watching. For day three, the theme is audience. How can museums ensure that the content they are delivering during the pandemic not only engages but supports their audience? How do we know if we’re connecting to a community and their needs during this time? The majority of talks either spoke directly or indirectly to this theme.

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MuseumNext Digital Summit: Day Two

If I was asked to summarise day two of the MuseumNext conference in one sentence it would be the following: COVID-19 has accelerated the need for museums to re-consider traditional ways of collecting and venture into the realm of collecting digital content from a diverse audience. I really enjoyed listening to how museums are adapting their collecting practices in order to respond rapidly to such significant historical events as the Australian bushfires and the pandemic. The pandemic in particular has spurred this need to have a procedure in place for not only collecting content quickly, but ethically. Especially when it comes to traumatic events – how can we protect both staff and visitors from re-living or re-experiencing trauma?

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MuseumNext Digital Summit: Day One

Welcome to my first blog post of 2021! A huge thank you to all my readers and subscribers for continuing to follow and for making 2020 the best year yet for new audiences and blog post visitation. This will be the first post in a series reflecting on the MuseumNext Digital Summit. For those of you who have never come across MuseumNext before, it is essentially a business driven to connect those passionate about museums and the future of these institutions. I have always wanted to attend one of their conferences, so took this opportunity to join the digital summit. Hopefully, one day soon, I’ll be able to attend one of their conferences in-person. I will add here that the focus and theme of this particular summit is, no surprises here, everything digital!

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Northshore Sculpture by the River

Despite writing in my previous post that I was excited to start blogging again, it has been just over three months and I haven’t had much to write about! That is, until yesterday, when I had the opportunity to go to Northshore Sculpture by the River in Hamilton, Brisbane. The best way to describe it is by saying it’s essentially a sculpture garden, with 26 sculptures lining a segment of the Brisbane River. As always, I’ll start with a quick overview before delving into some personal highlights.

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Anne Wallace: Strange Ways

Unfortunately today was this exhibition’s final day at the Queensland University of Technology Art Museum (QUT Art Museum). It will travel to Art Gallery of Ballarat in Victoria (28 March – 21 June 2020) and the Samstag Museum of Art in Adelaide (3 July – 11 September 2020). If you are near either of these galleries I strongly encourage you to go and see the exhibition and explore these enticing and thought-provoking paintings. I will share with you some of my favourite works, but first, I want to introduce you to the artist and talk a little about my first impressions of the exhibition. Continue reading “Anne Wallace: Strange Ways”

GOMA: Water

I have been looking forward to this exhibition for quite some time. Especially considering it is an exhibition that opens discussions on climate change and the fragility of the environment, as well as commenting on our role and relationship to our surroundings. It could not have opened at a more poignant time, particularly in Australia where drought and fires have ravaged parts of the country. It was fascinating to see how artists have interacted with this vital element. Not only in a ‘traditional’ way, i.e. photographs and sculptures, but in a playful way as well. More on that later. Continue reading “GOMA: Water”

Spring Hill Reservoirs: The Underground Opera Company

Last night I had the most incredible opportunity to attend a show by the Underground Opera Company in the Spring Hill Reservoirs. It truly was one of the best performances I have ever seen and the way it activated the heritage place was remarkable. The following blog post will be roughly divided into two sections. One on the Reservoirs, and the other on the Underground Opera Company. Weaved throughout will be my review of the evening. This will include reflections on re-purposing heritage places and why I think that process is of great value. Continue reading “Spring Hill Reservoirs: The Underground Opera Company”

Brisbane Open House: Lytton Quarantine Station

Visiting Lytton Quarantine Station has been on my ‘must-do’ list for too long. Thankfully, this weekend was Brisbane Open House, an annual event that sees select buildings open to the public. It is also a wonderful opportunity for people to engage with Brisbane’s heritage through self-guided or guided tours. It will probably come as no surprise, but I am fascinated in the history of disease. I have been researching the Spanish Flu lately so to see a place that would have quarantined those who suffered from the disease was quite remarkable. Before delving into our visit, here is some more information on the Station.

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Museum of Brisbane: New Woman

In mid-September this year, the Museum of Brisbane unveiled their new exhibition, New Woman. It features just over 80 artists, with artworks displayed chronologically starting from the 1920s. The exhibition is a really significant look at the women who have been an integral part of the development and continuing strength of Brisbane’s arts and culture scene. It is certainly a bright and colourful exhibition, accentuated by the almost neon orange walls. When I first entered the space I certainly had to adjust my eyes. There are a few aspects of this exhibition I want to focus on for this post. Continue reading “Museum of Brisbane: New Woman”