National Gallery of Victoria: Escher X nendo | Between Two Worlds

During a weekend getaway to Melbourne, I made sure to visit the National Gallery of Victoria (NGV) to see Escher X nendo | Between Two Worlds. I was quite familiar with the works of Escher having seen examples in optical illusion puzzle books. I was particularly excited to see the work titled Ascending and descending – luckily, it was in the exhibition!

Context

Just for some context, here is a very short summary of the artist Escher and design studio nendo.

M. C. Escher (1898-1972)

A Dutch graphic artist who was inspired by his travels and nature to create iconic prints. His later works were defined by tessellations, optical illusions, and representations of infinity.

nendo

A design studio based in Tokyo founded in 2002 by Oki Sato. The word nendo is Japanese for clay. The studio is focused on simplicity, curiosity and craftsmanship.Read More »

Howard Smith Wharves

A huge thank you to everyone who voted on my Instagram poll ‘should I blog about the heritage-listed Howard Smith Wharves?’ The result was 100% yes, so here we go. For those of you who would like to follow me on Instagram, my username is @curateyourownadventure. Or, you can click the Instagram icon on my home page!

Opening in November last year, the Howard Smith Wharves precinct is a new public place in Brisbane filled with parks, restaurants, function spaces/centres and a hotel. Just so you know my bias in this post, I am completely in favour of transforming heritage places if:

  1. The heritage is kept intact
  2. A transforming purpose breathes new life
  3. It prevents any thoughts or plans of demolition
  4. It’s appropriate to do so

There is nothing I love seeing more than a heritage place that has evolved and adapted whilst retaining its historical charm. I lied, I do love seeing dogs that have jobs. But, in terms of heritage, this is what I really love to see.Read More »

Gallery of Modern Art: The 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9)

Yesterday I visited the Gallery of Modern Art (GOMA) to see The 9th Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art (APT9). This is the first time I’ve ever seen this triennial art show. I was expecting maybe two or three rooms displaying a small number of artworks. Instead, I was really surprised that the exhibition is in fact huge and spreads over two floors at GOMA plus has a presence at the Queensland Art Gallery. There were a few artworks in particular that caught my attention, which I will cover in this blog post. First though, here is some context.

Context

The first Asia Pacific Triennial of Contemporary Art was held in 1993 at the Queensland Art Gallery. A new show is curated and put on display every three years (no surprises there). Today, and since 2006, the Triennial is held both at the Art Gallery and at GOMA. Both are located in Brisbane’s Cultural Centre.Read More »

Guest Post: MONA – Museum of Old and New Art

Imogen Kennard-King is back with an excellent blog post on the weird and wonderful world of MONA, Museum of Old and New Art. Thank you Imogen!

After a long absence, I am back with a blog sharing some observations from a recent visit to MONA, the Museum of Old and New Art, in Hobart, Tasmania. This was my first visit to both Tasmania and MONA. After studying, hearing about and writing about this museum from a distance since its opening in 2011, I was very eager to see it for myself. I was keen to see if the museum would live up to the extraordinary hype that surrounds it. This seemed almost impossible from the varied experiences and opinions I had heard prior to my visit. The central themes of sex and death have meant that the museum has always occupied a controversial space and inevitably drawn disparate and extreme reactions from visitors and commentators. While preparing for my visit I wasn’t sure how long to allow to ensure I saw everything and didn’t feel rushed. I couldn’t find much useful advice online so will share my timings here.Read More »

GLAM Blog Club: Serendipity

The theme for this month’s GLAM Blog Club is…….Serendipity. When you literally Google ‘definition: serendipity’ you get the following: “the occurrence and development of events by chance in a happy or beneficial way.” As soon as I saw the theme, one particular event came to mind that I’d like to share.

Queensland Parliamentary Library Curatorial Project

In 2013 I was approached by one of my lecturers at The University of Queensland to be part of a research project team working with the O’Donovan Collection at the Queensland Parliamentary Library. The O’Donovan Collection is this incredible array of rare books covering all sorts of topics from botany to philosophy and everything in-between. It dates back to 1860, when Queensland Parliament was formed. The collection was amassed to ensure that the Parliament had access to a contemporary series of books and manuscripts. One of the most notable collectors was Denis O’Donovan, Queensland Parliamentary Librarian from 1874 to 1901. He catalogued the collection so that future generations could more easily find information. Yay for cataloguing.Read More »

UQ Art Museum: Second Sight: Witchcraft, Ritual, Power

This evening I attended the opening of Second Sight: Witchcraft, Ritual, Power at The University of Queensland Art Museum. In 2015 I completed my Honours in history focusing on the memorialisation of the Salem Witch Trials in Salem and Danvers, Massachusetts. Needless to say, I have a very special place in my heart for anything to do with witchcraft. I was really looking forward to this exhibition and jumped at the chance to attend the opening.

Exhibition Aim

Before entering the exhibition, there is a panel explaining why this exhibition has been curated and what it’s hoping to achieve. According to the panel, the historical etchings and contemporary artworks seek to depict or disrupt ideas of witchcraft. Whereas some of the historic pieces have quite stereotypical depictions, the contemporary works delve deeper into themes of gender, nature and sexuality, to name a few.

It worked really well not having the works displayed chronologically. Instead, as the panel states, the exhibition becomes less literal and more open to interpretation. If I were seeing purely historic artworks, I would argue the opposite and hope they would be displayed in some sort of chronological or geographical way.

Read More »

Australian Museum: Whales/Tohorā

Thank you Ziggy for yet another fantastic blog post! Enjoy reading about the Whales/Tohorā exhibition currently on display at the Australian Museum.

The Whales/Tohorā exhibition, currently on at the Australian Museum, explores the evolution and biological diversity of whales, and their significant role in the cultural history and heritage of South Pacific Islanders. This exhibition was created by, and is on loan from, Te Papa Tongarewa (Museum of New Zealand).

All images included in this post are courtesy of Te Papa or the Australian Museum and have been retrieved from the Australian Museum website. Click here to visit the website.A huge thank you to Claire Vince and the Media and Communications Team at the Australian Museum for providing us with the following images and videos. Attribution information can be found beneath each image. Read More »