Carriageworks: Nick Cave, Until

When I first heard about this exhibition I thought wow, the Australian singer Nick Cave has an exhibition opening at Carriageworks! I soon discovered that there is also an American artist called Nick Cave. Just goes to show I do not operate in the world of contemporary art. Thank you to the other people out there who thought the exact same thing and have made me feel much less foolish.

Nick Cave (artist)

Nick Cave’s first collection of works, titled Soundsuit, were created in response to the beating of Rodney King in Los Angeles. The artworks are made from a variety of mediums including fabric and twigs. Their aim, to highlight social justice in a way that is both empowering and confronting.Read More »

Sydney Jewish Museum: The Fate of Things

In October 2018 I wrote a review on the Sydney Jewish Museum and its newly renovated permanent display (link). I basically had the same thoughts and feelings after visiting this time so I don’t want to repeat myself. I did, however, listen to the audio guide. I wish it was accessible outside of the museum so I could revisit some of the testimonies and read the more in depth information provided. Inside the museum space, it worked really well and, although the interface was quite clunky, it was so enlightening to have survivor testimonies available in each display area.

I also must say that the front of house staff were exceptional and made sure we knew exactly how to download the app and how it worked. Thank you!Read More »

The State Library of New South Wales: UNESCO Six

Members of Aboriginal and Torres Strait Islander communities are respectfully advised that this blog post contains the name and image of someone who has passed away.

I had a wonderful afternoon exploring The State Library of New South Wales and visiting the newly opened Michael Crouch Family Galleries. I was particularly interested to see the exhibition, UNESCO Six, a display of six significant collections that form part of Australia’s collective memory. I was lucky enough to be joined by a good friend which made the visit even more thought-provoking and enjoyable.

I don’t want to delve into this too much, but, I must begin by commenting on the problems of collective memory. Deeming certain things significant to a collective memory is absolutely riddled with exclusiveness and, potentially, alienation. What is deemed significant? Who makes these decisions and how much input is sought from the community? According to the exhibition, more collections from New South Wales will be added in years to come and these six collections only represent a segment of what is inscribed on the Memory of the World Register. Rather than solving the problem of who is in this collective memory and why, adding more to the mix might just exacerbate things.Read More »

GLAM Blog Club: What I Learned in 2018 & What I Want to Learn in 2019…

To prepare for writing this blog post I went back and read my post from last year on the same topic. Obviously it was reflecting on 2017 and looking forward to 2018. Very similar to 2017, you can pretty much slice my 2018 right down the middle into two equal segments. Up until July, I was working at Gladstone Regional Art Gallery & Museum. Then, I managed to secure my actual dream role at the Integrated Pathology Learning Centre at the University of Queensland. It was yet another year of moving around the place and learning new skills.

What I Learned in 2018…

2018 was one of those years that I don’t feel was overwhelmingly good or bad. It was filled with such extremes that, on balance, it turned out to be a pretty neutral year. What it did achieve, however, was setting me up for what will hopefully be a stable year in 2019.Read More »

Wellington Botanic Garden

On our final day in Wellington we visited the Wellington Botanic Gardens, right at the entry/exit of the Wellington Cable Car. I mention the Cable Car because it is a very convenient and interesting way to get from the city centre to the garden. If you don’t like heights then it’s probably best to avoid. The garden is open from dawn to dusk with some exceptions, i.e. the cafe in the rose garden and tree top information centre. If you are visiting, I strongly recommend going on the website to check when everything is open.Read More »